Blog Archive: Man-made Disasters

Crews finish work on Hyperion pipeline that might have prompted medical waste spill

Los Angeles sanitation officials on Monday announced the completion of a pipe replacement project that may have contributed to a spill in which more than a ton of medical and personal hygiene waste washed onto South Bay beaches in September. Condoms, tampon applicators, syringes and other waste that began showing up on Dockweiler State Beach and surrounding beaches on Sept. 23 may have been part of debris that was dislodged from a one-mile backup pipe that was brought back online while a longer, five-mile pipe that normally serves the Hyperion sewage treatment plant underwent maintenance.

Hyperion Treatment Plant officials queried over medical waste spill along South Bay beaches

As an investigation continues into September’s massive sewage spill off the South Bay coast, Hyperion Treatment Plant officials Thursday fielded questions from community members and environmentalists concerned that it could happen again. Public health officials believe Hyperion, the city of Los Angeles’ oldest and largest operating waste-water treatment plant, is responsible for the spill that spewed medical debris such as hypodermic needles, condoms and tampon applicators into the ocean and eventually ashore on Sept. 23.

Dockweiler State Beach closed after medical waste washes ashore

By City News Service appearing in the Daily Breeze LOS ANGELES >> Dockweiler State Beach has been closed until further notice after medical waste from a sewer pipe began washing up on the beach, officials announced tonight. Water at the beach also showed excessive levels of bacteria, while sanitary waste items and hypodermic needles had also washed ashore, officials said. The closure was announced at 6:20 p.m. The medical and other waste had been discharged

Coast Guard defends cleanup response to Santa Barbara oil spill

By MICHAEL R. BLOOD and ALICIA CHANG, Associated Press LOS ANGELES >> The leader overseeing a massive oil cleanup along the California coast defended the initial response, saying there were workers on the ground after the spill that stained popular beaches. The first wave of workers deployed booms in the water to corral the oil slick and placed them along the shoreline to protect ecologically sensitive habitats. Others vacuumed up oil from the site of

Did owner of broken Santa Barbara oil pipeline do enough?

SANTA BARBARA >> Emergency workers and officials from a pipeline operator had gathered last week to train for the worst — an oil spill — when a 911 call came in reporting a noxious smell at a nearby beach. Santa Barbara County firefighters rushed to the shoreline, where they discovered oil flowing across a beach and into the Pacific. What was supposed to be a drill turned real.

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