Blog Archive: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Yet another setback for SpaceX

By Christopher Weber and John Antczak, The Associated Press LOS ANGELES >> After successfully delivering a U.S.-European ocean-monitoring satellite into orbit, a Space X rocket made a hard landing on a floating barge in the roiling Pacific, breaking a support leg and toppling over Sunday. SpaceX announcers said the first stage of the Falcon 9 was not upright after reaching the 300-by-170 foot landing pad in choppy seas about 200 miles west of San Diego.

Jason-3 Launches to Monitor Global Sea Level Rise

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE >> Jason-3, a U.S.-European oceanography satellite mission with NASA participation that will continue a nearly quarter-century record of tracking global sea level rise, lifted off from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California Sunday at 10:42 a.m. PST (1:42 p.m. EST) aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Jason-3 is an international mission led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in partnership with NASA, the French space agency CNES, and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites.

San Pedro’s Marine Mammal Care Center sees uptick in starving animals

San Pedro’s Marine Mammal Care Center is set to open its new 300-square-foot enclosure Thursday. And it’s coming just in time. This year looks to be a repeat of 2013 and 2014, when starving sea lion pups turned up on beaches in large numbers, taxing the center’s space and resources. Actually, thus far, 2015 seems even worse. For comparison, by this time last year, the center had admitted 24 animals, said David Bard, executive director of the Marine Mammal Care Center at Fort MacArthur in Angels Gate Park. So far this year, he said the center has brought in 48 animals for treatment.

Jump in sea lion deaths last year due to food shortages, scientists believe

By Sandy Mazza, Daily Breeze A rash of dying and dead sea lion pups found on Southern California beaches last year was probably simply a result of their inability to get enough good meals — rather than a mass infection or disease, scientists announced Tuesday after months of collaborative research. Analysis of the “unusual mortality event” that caused more than 1,600 California sea lions to strand along the coast in 2013 found that the marine mammals

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